I am a firm believer that cityscape of any town directly corresponds to the nature and inner world of its dwellers. A few hours of interacting with sanjuaneros was enough to see how welcoming, joyful and laid-back Puerto Ricans are. The city and those living here are full of character and zest for life. And this is very well reflected on the facades of the city as well which can be described as a rainbow feast of historic architecture.


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Showcasing almost 500 years of history, the streetscape of San Juan Viejo is dotted with beautifully restored Spanish colonial facades dating back to 16th and 17th century.


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The city was founded in 1509 by the explorer Juan Ponce de León who originally established a colony in an area now known as Caparra, southeast of present-day San Juan. He later moved the settlement north to a more hospitable peninsular location.


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This door seems to have so much character!

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Look at this narrow yellow house!

Defended by the imposing Castillo San Felipe del Morro (El Morro) and Castillo San Cristóbal, Puerto Rico’s administrative and population center remained firmly in Spain’s hands until 1898, when it came under U.S. control after the Spanish-American War. Centuries of Spanish rule left an indelible imprint on the city, particularly in the walled area of Old San Juan.


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Spanish colonial buildings with tiled roofs, ornate balconies, and architectural flourishes are awash in candy-colored shades.


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One of the most famous streets in San Juan Calle Fortaleza is lined up with candy-colored houses leading to the magnificent palace of La Fortaleza, which is currently the governor’s residence. To have a sneak peek into the opulent ambiance of the palace, read part one of my Caribbean cruise adventures.

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I found Haitian art and crafts gallery in San Juan!

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By the way, the coffee house Caficultura pictured above allegedly has one of the best coffees in Old San Juan and offers delicious cocina de mercado. Unfortunately, they were under renovation during my visit so I never got a chance to sample their brews. However, I still managed to snap a photo of their famous magnificent antique chandelier!


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Spy patches of beautiful blue cobblestones on the ground, which were brought as ballast on European ships in the 1700s. In the noonday sun, they glisten—and vary in tone, from light sky blue to dark denim.


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Nothing beats leisurely roaming through the winding backstreets and plazas dotted throughout the old town to experience the affable presence of the locals.


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The metal gates and balconies are so ornately crafted.


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The metal gates, balconies and doors are so ornately crafted.


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Sorry, I got a bit distracted from the colorful facades by this enticing offer!

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It’s worth noting that the present state of Old San Juan is hugely attributed to the efforts of an anthropologist by the name of Ricardo Alegría. By 1940s San Juan had turned into a decrepit and unsightly state and politicians called for the historic old buildings to be smashed to make way for sleek, modern ones. Alegría convinced the authorities to preserve the beautiful colonial architecture of Old San Juan and it was revitalized in alignment with its colonial Spanish architectural roots. The 7-mile-square city was declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1983.


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The mural salutes Alegria’s efforts to restore the city.

And because all the colorful streets were not enough, I have to spruce up my post with a few more tropical palettes of my new friends! 😉


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The white one was very much into grabbing my flower headpiece.

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And then this happened. 😉

As you can tell, I fell irrevocably in love with this vibrant and colorful city. I certainly hope to come back some day and explore it further. This is certainly a great vacation destination.

Have you been to San Juan? Share your stories in the comments!

This is part 3 of my Caribbean Cruise Adventure series. Follow the links to read about must-see sights in Old San Juan and Puerto Rican culinary delights.


Written by Nano @ Travel With Nano B.

Welcome to my site! I'm Nano, a serial expat trotting the globe to discover wonderful places and savor the gastronomic treasures of the world. Via Travel With Nano B. I'm spilling my love for travel and detailing my international culinary adventures one lil' blog post at a time. Currently based in Japan, I'm on a quest to explore this magnificent country and share my unique insight with you all. Worldly adventures, gourmet discoveries, cultural experiences, wanderlust photography, savvy travel tips - find it all on my page. Needless to say, I am thrilled to have you here reading!

9 comments

  1. Hi

    This looks like such a beautiful place. In a way it looks like 3 of my favorite spots mashed together into one beautiful calm setting.

    Where are all the people though? Lol I love your photo’s but is the city/own really that quite? How amazing if it is.

    If you have any planning tips for me, please let me know 🙂 I would love to do this mid 2016.
    Awesome article.

    Keep going
    #LoveAndTravelHugs©
    Cee

    Like

    1. Thanks a lot, I am so glad you enjoyed this post. The city is indeed very beautiful. It is more crowded when the cruise ships dock in, otherwise it is very quite and idyllic. I also wrote two posts about must-see sights in San Juan, as well as traditional Puerto Rican dishes to try and some great local eateries to check out. They may help you in your travel planning. I am sure you will love San Juan! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

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